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Fantasy
August 20, 2012 posted by Nichole

Firelight – Sophie Jordan

A hidden truth. 
Mortal enemies. 
Doomed love.

Marked as special at an early age, Jacinda knows her every move is watched. But she longs for freedom to make her own choices. When she breaks the most sacred tenet among her kind, she nearly pays with her life. Until a beautiful stranger saves her. A stranger who was sent to hunt those like her. For Jacinda is a draki, a descendant of dragons whose greatest defense is her secret ability to shift into human form.

Forced to flee into the mortal world with her family, Jacinda struggles to adapt to her new surroundings. The only bright light is Will. Gorgeous, elusive Will who stirs her inner draki to life. Although she is irresistibly drawn to him, Jacinda knows Will’s dark secret: He and his family are hunters. She should avoid him at all costs. But her inner draki is slowly slipping away —if it dies she will be left as a human forever. She’ll do anything to prevent that. Even if it means getting closer to her most dangerous enemy.

Mythical powers and breathtaking romance ignite in this story of a girl who defies all expectations and whose love crosses an ancient divide.

Far away in the mountains lives the Draki Pride, a group of dragon shapeshifters who roam the world in secret. Among them lives Jacinda, a fire-breathing draki who has a very hard time following the laws of the Pride. One day Jacinda and her best friend, Az, break one of the most sacred rules among their Pride: They fly in the daylight. While they may not like to acknowledge it, this rule is there for a reason, as they soon find out when hunters chase them down during their afternoon flight. Jacinda’s life is spared, however, when a young hunter, Will, decides to spare Jacinda’s life.

On the outs with her fellow Pride, Jacinda’s mother forces her and her sister, Tamra, to flee in the middle of the night to a remote desert far away from the Pride. Here, Jacinda’s mother is convinced that they need to start a fresh, normal life, even if that means that Jacinda must kill off her draki. Things don’t go as smoothly as Jacinda’s mom may hope for, though, when Jacinda learns that Will and the rest of his family live in the town her mother brought them to.  Now Jacinda is struggling with an intense desire for Will, something that she is not prepared to handle. But Will seems to be the only thing in this dry desert that can keep her draki alive.

What will Jacinda do for love?

 

I am fascinated with the concept of shapeshifters, So, when I found out that there was a whole series dedicated to dragon shapeshifters, I was completely on board. The action in this book started right off the bat. I was about five pages into the book before my heart started pounding, and I was racing with Jacinda and Az in the sky. I found myself jumping and jerking, doing everything in my power (which wasn’t very much, obviously) to get the two girls into safety.

I was a really big fan of the main character, Jacinda. I enjoyed reading about a girl who didn’t follow the rules all the time. I also had a lot of empathy for her. I understood her desire to be free and not bow down to the will of others. I felt her agony over being in a completely new school, with people she never met before. Overall, I think that she handled the situation as best as she could. I was really proud of her throughout the whole book.

I cannot express how much I hated Jacinda’s mother. I thought that it was completely hideous that her mom was trying to force her to kill a part of herself. Everytime that Jacinda begged, cried, pleaded with her mother, or expressed how much killing off her draki hurt, her mother either expressed disappointment or anger. I’m sorry, but you’re upset that you’re daughter is complaining that you are physically causing her pain? Really? That upsets you? I almost couldn’t finish the book because of the mom. I found it appalling. Jacinda’s sister, Tamra, was not much better. She constantly raged at Jacinda, threatening to never forgive her if she didn’t kill off her draki. Everyone should feel comfortable with themselves, especially in their families. I would never put up with someone talking to me like that, and it really bothered me that it was happening in the book.

I was not a fan of the love triangle in the book. It’s barely there during the first book, Firelight, but there are mentions of it and it’s pretty much inevitable. I have to warn everyone that Sophie Jordan pulls an Andrea Cremer. It’s not that kind of storyline where you don’t know who the heroine is going to end up with. Instead, it’s that kind of storyline where the author flaunts another male character in your face, makes several people fall in love with him, and makes it clear that that will never happen.

Overall, I enjoyed this book. There were plenty of times that I almost gave it four stars, but I settled on three and a half. Fans of Kelley Armstrong, Andrea Cremer, and Nina Berry will really enjoy reading this book.

Pages: 326

Publication Date: September 7, 2010

Publisher: HarperTeen

Rating: : ★★★½☆

 

Teaser Quote: “‘You mean I’ll be dead,’ I insert accusingly. ‘Why don’t you say what you mean? You mean that my draki will soon be dead. Can’t you ever stop? Quit acting like killing a part of me…killing me is this inevitable thing that you’re happy about. Why can’t you just accept me for me?'”

 

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2 Comments

  • I read Firelight a year back. I wish I could say it was a good book for me. I find it too cliché perhaps? Glad that some one else enjoyed it!

    ~Ariella @ A Sprinkle of Books

  • Read this a while ago, and I found it pretty so so. It’s much better than a lot of other generic shape shifter books around, but the clear manoeuvring of another love triangle in the sequel and lack of real originality meant I never found the motivation to read the rest. In regards to the mother, I got why she acted the way she did – the dragon community was creepily cultish and she believed it was the only way to protect her daughter. Having said that, he clearly overreacted and I definitely felt Jacinda’s frustration with her. Nontheless it was annoying that Jacinda didn’t seem to get how creepy the dragons were, and I could empathise with Tamra’s feelings since she couldn’t turn into a dragon and wasn’t an outsider for the first time in her life – I wanted to punch her sometimes but she was believable.

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